Food & Drink

How Do Food Allergies Cause Acne?

foodallergy

Food allergies are the number one cause of acne, and the worse the acne is the more likely food allergies are involved. Eating a food to which the body is allergic leads to a continuous toxic reaction. The immune system fights the food as if it were an invading organism. This can cause inflammation in the skin (and many other conditions), as well as the need to eliminate the toxin.

What Foods cause acne? 
There isn’t just one food that causes acne. Any food allergy is able to produce acne. However, the most common cause of acne is usually dairy products.

Why is it so difficult to recognise your own food allergy? 
This is problematic because of the often delayed nature of food allergies. Allergy symptoms may show up hours or even a day later, after a food is well absorbed into your system. And acne generally doesn’t come and go quickly enough to be associated with food.

This difficulty is compounded by the fact that certain foods, such as dairy and wheat, are so prevalent in our diet that many people eat them nearly every day. Therefore connecting your symptoms with your eating habits is often nearly impossible.

What causes a food allergy? 
It is most likely that food allergies are genetically predetermined. In the big picture, humans have only recently introduced many current day foods into the diet, so it’s not surprising that the immune system doesn’t recognize every food as a friendly substance.
However, we undoubtedly do not understand everything there is to know about food or food allergies.

Food & Drink

Top 5 key meal ingredients!

kitchen

The change in your diet makes a huge impact to your skin, so why not eat nutritious foods that help soothe inflammation. The best way to go about eating when it comes to healthy looking skin is to avoid red meat completely and eat as much seafood and vegetables as possible.

So below are my 5 go to key ingredients when it comes to preparing your meals:

Salmon

  • Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids.
  • Great Source of Protein.
  • High in B Vitamins.
  • Good Source of Potassium.
  • Loaded With Selenium.
  • Contains the Antioxidant Astaxanthin.
  • May Reduce the Risk of Heart Disease.
  • May Benefit Weight Control.

Turkey

  • Turkey is a rich source of protein.
  • Skinless turkey is low in fat.
  • Turkey meat is a source of iron, zinc, potassium and phosphorus.
  • It is also a source of vitamin B6 and niacin, which are both essential for the body’s energy production.
  • Regular turkey consumption can help lower cholesterol levels.

Chicken

  • High in Protein.
  • Rich in phosphorus, an essential mineral that supports your teeth and bones.
  • Chicken also abundant in selenium, an essential mineral involved in metabolic performance.
  • Chicken is a good source of selenium, which is essential for protecting cells and supporting immune function.
  • Niacin is also found in chicken and is a vitamin that helps your body use sugars and fatty acids more efficiently.
  • Vitamin B6, which helps your body make the nonessential amino acids used to make body cells.

Fruit/Veggie option

  • Fruits and veggies provide fiber that helps fill you up and keeps your digestive system happy.
  • Low in Calories.
  • Rich in vitamins and minerals that help you feel healthy and energized.
  • There are loads of different types to always try and have great benefits.

Quorn

  • High in Protein
  • High in Fibre
  • Good replacement of beef
  • Good way to loose weight
  • Low unsaturated fat content
  • Cholesterol free
Food & Drink · Health

Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid

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Wondering what healthy foods are best for you? Well, here I have created an Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid to solve that problem! This food pyramid can help you gain useful information as well as helping you to structure a diet! I pretty much live off these foods (with the odd treat here and there) Read below for more information 🙂

Healthy Sweets – Dark chocolate provides polyphenols with antioxidant activity. Choose dark chocolate with at least 70 percent pure cocoa and have an ounce a few times a week. Fruit sorbet is a better option than other frozen desserts.

Red Wine – Red wine has beneficial antioxidant activity. Limit intake to no more than 1-2 servings per day. If you do not drink alcohol, do not start.

Tea – Tea is rich in catechins, antioxidant compounds that reduce inflammation. Purchase high-quality tea and learn how to correctly brew it for maximum taste and health benefits.

Healthy herbs & spices – Use these herbs and spices generously to season foods. Turmeric and ginger are powerful, natural anti-inflammatory agents.

Other sources of protein – In general, try to reduce consumption of animal foods.  If you eat chicken, choose organic, cage-free chicken and remove the skin and associated fat.  Use organic, high-quality dairy products moderately, especially yogurt and natural cheeses such as Emmental (Swiss), Jarlsberg and true Parmesan.  If you eat eggs, choose omega-3 enriched eggs (made by feeding hens a flax-meal-enriched diet), or eggs from free-range chickens.

Cooked Asian mushrooms – These mushrooms contain compounds that enhance immune function. Never eat mushrooms raw, and minimize consumption of common commercial button mushrooms (including crimini and portobello).

Whole soy foods – Soy foods contain isoflavones that have antioxidant activity and are protective against cancer.  Choose whole soy foods over fractionated foods like isolated soy protein powders and imitation meats made with soy isolate.

Fish & seafood – These fish are rich in omega-3 fats, which are strongly anti-inflammatory. If you choose not to eat fish, take a molecularly distilled fish oil supplement, 2-3 grams per day.

Healthy fats – Healthy fats are those rich in either monounsaturated or omega-3 fats.  Extra-virgin olive oil is rich in polyphenols with antioxidant activity and canola oil contains a small fraction of omega-3 fatty acids.

Whole & cracked grains – Whole grains digest slowly, reducing frequency of spikes in blood sugar that promote inflammation. “Whole grains” means grains that are intact or in a few large pieces, not whole wheat bread or other products made from flour.

Whole wheat pasta – Low-glycemic-load carbohydrates should be the bulk of your carbohydrate intake to help minimize spikes in blood glucose levels.

Beans & legumes – Beans are rich in folic acid, magnesium, potassium and soluble fiber.  They are a low-glycemic-load food.  Eat them well-cooked either whole or pureed into spreads like hummus.

Supplements – Supplements help fill any gaps in your diet when you are unable to get your daily requirement of micronutrients.

Vegetables – Vegetables are rich in flavonoids and carotenoids with both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.  Go for a wide range of colors, eat them both raw and cooked, and choose organic when possible.

Fruits – Fruits are rich in flavonoids and carotenoids with both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.  Go for a wide range of colors, choose fruit that is fresh in season or frozen, and buy organic when possible.

Water – Water is vital for overall functioning of the body.

Food & Drink · Health

What not to eat

Studies so far have focused mostly on the foods that make acne worse. Here are the five that come up most often as culprits in increasing breakouts. Avoid these for about a week, and see if you notice a difference.

What were the foods mentioned? Look below…

Sugar: It may be hard to resist desserts, pastries, chocolate bars, sodas, even fruit juices. However, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition warns that processed sugars trigger the release of inflammatory messengers called cytokines. Sugar goes by many names so look out for any word ending in “ose,” e.g. fructose or sucrose on ingredient labels.

Saturated Fats: Several studies have shown that saturated fats trigger adipose (fat tissue) inflammation, which is not only an indicator for heart disease but it also worsens arthritis inflammation. Pizza and cheese are the biggest sources of saturated fats in the average American diet, according to the National Cancer Institute. Other culprits include meat products (especially red meat), full-fat dairy products, pasta dishes and grain-based desserts.

Trans Fats: Harvard School of Public Health researchers helped sound the alarm about trans fat in the early 1990s. Known to trigger systemic inflammation, trans fat can be found in fast foods and other fried products, processed snack foods, frozen breakfast products, cookies, donuts, crackers and most stick margarines. Avoid foods with partially hydrogenated oils in the ingredient labels.

Omega 6 Fatty acids: Omega 6 fatty acids are an essential fatty acid that the body needs for normal growth and development. The body needs a healthy balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Excess consumption of omega-6s can trigger the body to produce pro-inflammatory chemicals. These fatty acids are found in oils such corn, safflower, sunflower, grape seed, soy, peanut, and vegetable; mayonnaise; and many salad dressings.

Refined Carbohydrates: White flour products (breads, rolls, crackers) white rice, white potatoes (instant mashed potatoes, or french fries) and many cereals are refined carbohydrates. According to Scientific American, processed carbohydrates may trump fats as the main driver of escalating rates of obesity and other chronic conditions. These high-glycemic index foods fuel the production of advanced glycation end (AGE) products that stimulate inflammation.